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biomorphosis:

When you flip bats upside down they become exceptionally sassy dancers.

Saturday, June 7, 2014

Things almost every author needs to research

shevathegun:

clevergirlhelps:

the-right-writing:

  • How bodies decompose
  • Wilderness survival skills
  • Mob mentality
  • Other cultures
  • What it takes for a human to die in a given situation
  • Common tropes in your genre
  • Average weather for your setting

yoooo

fuck yes

Monday, June 2, 2014
Friday, May 16, 2014
Saturday, May 10, 2014
The rest of the world a month ago: Why does the US feel like it has a right to police the world?
The rest of the world now: WHY THE FUCK ISN'T THE US POLICING THE WORLD.
"Parting Is Such Sweet Sorrow (The Balcony Scene, Pt. 2)" by The Prague Philharmonic Orchestra & Chorus
Friday, May 9, 2014

leslieseuffert:

Ryan McArthur has created this line of prints using quotations from some of the most brilliant minds. He illustrates each of his simple, clean designs by hand then manually traces each line converting it to a vector graphic to scale and manipulate. 

"

Here’s a basic rule: if you’re reading or watching a Shakespeare play, and you’re not imagining the actors standing in front of a mosh pit of jeering Londoners waiting to throw vegetables at the stage, you’re doing it wrong.

Shakespeare might have written the best works in the English language, or given us profound insight into the nature of humanity, or whatever — but his works wouldn’t have survived to our day if he hadn’t been popular when he was alive, and he wouldn’t have been popular when he was alive if he hadn’t been able to please the crowd. And that includes a lot of dirty jokes. A lot.

Sometimes in incredibly inappropriate places. We’re here to rescue a few of those for you, and retroactively embarrass the heck out of your fourteen-year-old self, who had to stand up in English class and read things that, in retrospect, are absolutely filthy.

This isn’t about the stuff that always does crack fourteen-year-olds up in English class, but is totally innocent: the “bring me my long sword, ho!” sort of thing.

But the kids who lose it every time the word “ho” is uttered are closer to the spirit of Shakespeare than the teacher who demands they treat the words like museum pieces.

Sure, it would be awkward for teachers to explain the Elizabethan double entendres to their students — but pretending they don’t exist makes Shakespeare seem unnecessarily stuffy and difficult.

So we’re going to start with the most obvious innuendoes, and move on to some seriously advanced sex punnery that is probably going to blow your mind.

"

Reading Shakespeare without the sex jokes is the real tragedy. (via newsweek)

Making literature and curriculum content more boring than it needs to be doesn’t help with learning or teaching the material people *sigh*

(via myownliteraryself)

Thursday, May 8, 2014
Tuesday, May 6, 2014
oysterbooks:

Our graph shows reading speed (on the y axis) over the words of the novel (on the x axis) for Pride and Prejudice. Because everyone reads at a different pace, we compared the relative increases and decreases in each person’s reading rate and took the average. 
The data revealed three periods of especially speedy reading that correlate directly with heightened moments in the plot and also, perhaps predictably, with increased mention of Mr. Darcy’s name. This is an infographic love letter. 
Yours truly dear Darcy, 
Team Oyster

oysterbooks:

Our graph shows reading speed (on the y axis) over the words of the novel (on the x axis) for Pride and Prejudice. Because everyone reads at a different pace, we compared the relative increases and decreases in each person’s reading rate and took the average.

The data revealed three periods of especially speedy reading that correlate directly with heightened moments in the plot and also, perhaps predictably, with increased mention of Mr. Darcy’s name. This is an infographic love letter.

Yours truly dear Darcy,

Team Oyster

Sunday, May 4, 2014
"Well, let it pass, he thought; April is over, April is over. There are all kinds of love in the world, but never the same love twice."
F. Scott Fitzgerald  (via thatkindofwoman)
Friday, May 2, 2014
"Hearts are wild creatures, that’s why our ribs are cages."
(via elalusz)
 
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